excerpt: Butterfly Hunter

An excerpt from the novel. Australian tour guide Dave first meets his rather unexpected new client, Nicholas, the son of an English earl.

Microsoft Office clipart (cropped) - ButterflyThe plane was due in just after seven in the morning. Dave made sure he was there in plenty of time, even though the Englishman would need to go through passport control, collect his luggage, and then get through quarantine. All of which would take an hour, probably – but it would be just Dave’s luck if he turned up at eight to find that the earl’s son had been processed as a VIP or some such thing, and had been waiting on him ever since.

Dave found a place to lean on the waist-high barriers with the drivers and others carrying signs. His own read GORING. That was the guy’s name. Nicholas Goring. Which perhaps made his father Earl Goring, or was it the Earl of Goring … ? When Dave wasn’t chatting in an early morning haze to his current companions, he spent the time trying to remember whether he’d had any clue about whether Nicholas was the eldest son or not – and if he was, whether that meant Dave should address him as ‘my lord’ or as ‘sir’. He’d looked it up on Wikipedia, realised he’d need to email the butler for more information, and then promptly let it all slip his mind.

He was kicking himself, metaphorically at least. He was always more professional than this. Always. And all right, maybe titles didn’t matter very much – though he was sure they’d matter more to an Englishman than an Australian – but no one could afford to be this slapdash in the Outback. Why would Goring trust Dave with his life, if he couldn’t even get this detail right?

Continue reading excerpt: Butterfly Hunter

Albert J Sterne: Future Bright, Past Imperfect

Albert J Sterne: Future Bright, Past Imperfect ebook coverBlurb: Three young boys on a collision course: Albert Sterne – isolated, driven and fiercely intellectual; Fletcher Ash – bright, dedicated and with a strong sense of justice; John Garrett – hurt, marginalised and determined to do to the world exactly what the world has done to him. The eleven short stories in this companion volume continue and expand on the lives of the characters from the same author’s outstandingly popular The Definitive Albert J. Sterne, which should preferably be read first.

Genre: gay fiction; contemporary; drama; stories

Word count: 61,000

Click here for an excerpt of text, and here for the reviews.

Awards: First in LadyM’s Top Books for 2012 in the Guest Reviewer’s Top Picks for 2012 on Reviews by Jessewave.

Available in ebook format from:

The stories in this volume have also been incorporated in the paperback edition of The Definitive Albert J. Sterne.

reviews: Albert J. Sterne: Future Bright, Past Imperfect

Gosh! Albert’s companion volume has received some very flattering attention indeed! Thank you all for welcoming back the dear old curmudgeon.

Top 2 Bottom Reviews: 4 kisses from Jen

Conclusion: All in all, this book was magnificent and you’ll want to read more.

Reviews by Jessewave: 4.5 stars from LadyM

Conclusion: This collection of stories was certainly more emotional than the novel, since it revolves more around characters’ lives than the plot about a serial killer. It has been a while since I’ve enjoyed a writer’s style so much, unobtrusive and yet clearly capable of conveying Albert’s losses, Garrett’s hatred, Fletcher’s love. The stories added the facets of their private lives successfully deepening our overall understanding of their characters. If you read The Definitive Albert J. Sterne, this collection is a must read. If you didn’t, I wholeheartedly recommend both books to you. Both the novel and the stories are great addition to this genre and the complexity of the characters alone recommend them to anyone who enjoys reading.

Albert: FBPI at Goodreads:

Currently 31 ratings, 13 reviews and an average of 4.55 stars.

  • Aussie54 gave it 5 stars, and said: Reading about Fletcher and his family was a joy. … It was hard to put my eReader down! I couldn’t wait to see what happened with Fletcher and Albert (even re-reading the first Albert along with this second book was compelling …).
  • Silver Iris gave it 5 stars, and said: I’m not sure I can describe just how much I love Albert & Ash. These short stories that are snippets into their lives beyond the novel were fantastic. I want to see more into their future.

excerpt: Albert J Sterne: Future Bright, Past Imperfect

An excerpt from the story The Rending of Cloth (New York City, October 1952). The child Albert grieves for his murdered parents.

Microsoft Office clipartAlbert’s early childhood was mostly vague impressions. The love between his parents, and their love for Albert, was strong and constant and inviolate. But none of them were ever very demonstrative, there were never any displays of sentiment. The love was simply there as the foundation of everything they did, all the choices they made, the way they kept company only with each other, the scrupulous care taken to ensure that Albert had everything he needed to grow into everything he could be.

There were hazy moments he could remember. Albert, curled up in his father’s lap, listening to Rebecca’s calm voice tell the story of an old friend, long dead; Miles as rapt as the boy. The three of them being polite at some obscure relative’s after­noon tea, then mischievously sharing their boredom with each other through grimaces and raised eye­brows behind the woman’s back – they had gone home and read all evening, happy in their shared silence. Both of his parents a little giddy, someone having talked them into a fine restaurant on their twelfth wedding anniversary, dressing in their usual dull clothes – but Miles had bought Rebecca a silk scarf. The dark green of it picked out the reddish tint to her brown hair, which she left loose for once. Her eyes had glowed.

Late that night, she clutched the scarf in her dead hand and wouldn’t let it go.

Continue reading excerpt: Albert J Sterne: Future Bright, Past Imperfect

The Valley of the Shadow of Death

Blurb: Joshua Delaney and Carmine Angelo Trezini, cop and mobster, should have absolutely nothing in common. Yet, accidentally brought together, they rapidly became both lovers and allies against organized crime boss Matthew Picano. Of course, taking down a man like that was never going to be easy – but Josh has no idea of the scale of the sacrifice he will eventually be called upon to make.

Genre: gay fiction; contemporary; organised crime thriller; novel; not a romance!

Word count: 51,900

Click here for an excerpt of text, and here for the reviews.

Available in ebook and paperback formats from:

reviews: The Valley of the Shadow of Death

Note: Quoted reviews are all of the Manifold Press edition. The novel has been revised for publication by LIBRAtiger.

The Romanceaholic: 3 stars from a Romance Addict

Excerpt: This book quite literally sucked me in and wouldn’t let me go. … The angst and tension caused by Carmine’s double crossing his boss/best friend was wonderful, and the courtroom drama a delight. The romance that was developing between Josh and Carmine was intense and angst-ridden due not only to the stress of the undercover operation, but because Josh … was struggling with embarrassment, confusion, shame, anger, lust, guilt, developing emotional feelings and fear for Carmine’s life.

MM Good Book Reviews: 3.5 stars from Pixie

Excerpt: This is a well written book that has a very good story-line and plot. Angelo is the guy that I fell in love with in this book. He just seems to live life to the fullest, embracing his love for Josh and just going with it … This book I will recommend to those who love cop/mobster love affairs, court room drama and gentle love.

Reviews by Jessewave: 3 stars from Cryselle

Excerpt: Give it to Cryssy: she’ll read anything. … There is one very interesting take on the sex. When they do arrive at the moment of attempting anal sex, Delaney isn’t thrilled down to his socks and yearns for it to be over, but he wants Trezini to be happy. Not sexy, but unique, and one of the few moments we see the relationship growing. … The ending is as tragic as the title promises, the last line the most moving in the entire work.

Top 2 Bottom Reviews: 3 kisses from Lisa

Excerpt: I really liked the premise for The Valley of the Shadow of Death. I love a good redemption story … There’s plenty of foreshadowing along the way to prepare the reader for the ending to this story, which was entirely plausible. The author didn’t pull out the eleventh hour ‘deus ex machina’ for the sake of a tidy finish, which I was grateful for.

Angelo at Goodreads:

  • Sofia gave it 4 stars, and said: As usual Bozza is able to give a different perspective. Her worldview is particular and a worldview I like to visit. So the story is not accessorized with the ‘Hollywood’ custom jewellery which has made ‘hood’ stories stereotypical. Rather we have a story cleaned and refined down to people involved, idealistic Joshua and the realist Angelo. Angelo who gets hope for redemption from the faith of Joshua and acts upon it right on till the end.
  • Ingrid gave it 5 stars, and said: OMG She has done it again…. speechlesss
  • Sylvia gave it 4 stars, and said: I was about to give 3* until I read the last pages.
  • Kaje Harper said: This one is impossible for me to rate. Once again, I loved Julie Bozza’s writing voice, but it was a slightly awkward fit with this story. This had characters and development that should have been a bit gritty, given the plot. Instead it had a gentle, noir, early-twentieth feel, to the point where I kept getting startled when they pulled out cell phones. Delaney was wonderful, as a youthful, naive, optimistic, crusading cop – the writing style worked very well for him and his intrinsic, slightly simple goodness. For Carmine, the mobster turned informant, it was less effective.

Angelo on Amazon UK and Amazon US:

  • bill m gave it 4 stars, and said: this is a wonderfully written story, but it’s a tough read — astonishingly realistic. There’s a lot of stuff in this genre that’s contrived and artificial; this one isn’t like that. It’s tense, uplifting, gritty and sad. But it would be hard not to recommend it, and I do.
  • CatsAndChardonnay gave it 5 stars, and said: I am a fan, for certain, and this book doesn’t disappoint anyone who is a Julie Bozza fan. She has a way of writing that is very distinct and draws the reader in. Highly recommend.

excerpt: The Valley of the Shadow of Death

An excerpt from the first chapter of this novel. A cop and a mobster find themselves thrown together in a life-or-death situation.

Microsoft Office clipart - This could almost be Delaney!Angelo Trezini was slowing down, too cold and too dull to even think. Well, his only thought was a wistful wish for the energy necessary to feel sad or sorry or righteously pissed off. He was fading fast.

He was in a freezer. A large storage room of a freezer, packed high with cartons of food, and lit so brightly that Trezini was forced to squint. When his eyes were open, that is. Mostly he was just pacing in a circle, eyes shut tight against the harsh light and harsher cold, arms wrapped around his chest. He’d lost count of the number of times he’d walked this circle, but it was often enough that he didn’t have to look where he was going anymore.

A muffled clang, and the door swung open. It all happened so fast, and Trezini was feeling so slow that he didn’t have a chance to take advantage of the situation. As luck would have it, he was as far away as his circle took him – by the time he’d turned and drawn his gun, the door was already slamming shut again. And Trezini had company.

He was staring down his gun-barrel at a big dumb hunk of a man wearing a cop’s uniform. A man who was so ridiculously handsome that Trezini almost forgot the cold for a moment. There was a stillness about the man, a sense that he was completely self-contained.

Continue reading excerpt: The Valley of the Shadow of Death

Homosapien … a fantasy about pro wrestling

Homosapien ebook coverBlurb: Patrick and David are friends who run a gay bookstore, and life seems simple and safe enough until the day when unexpectedly he walks in – six feet tall, gorgeous and built like a dream. But Homosapien isn’t welcome in their world; he’s a professional wrestler, and everything he does is fake. So he can’t really be gay, can he, or interested in either one of them? Can they even trust a single word he says…?

Endorsement: This tag team tussle with genre and gender chokeslams and chinlocks the reader into submission.
Gideon Haigh, self-unemployed freelance journalist

Genre: male-male romance; contemporary; sports entertainment; novel

Word count: 67,000

Click here for an excerpt of text, and here for the reviews.

Available in ebook format from:

Available in paperback format from:

reviews: Homosapien

Homosapien has received four full reviews now, and some interesting attention at Goodreads.

‘Is it Real?’: 5 stars from A.B. Gayle

Excerpt: If you’re expecting a traditional m/m romance, this isn’t the book for you, but if you’re looking for an amusing, heart-warming, thought-provoking book this is. While Patrick, her narrator, is awed by the romance that blossoms between his dour, idealistic, intelligent boss and his hero, a flamboyant pro-wrestler, he also explores the true nature of pro-wrestling and discovers the potentially deal-breaking fact that the fights and characters are all scripted. Note, I didn’t say “fake” and the difference is very much at the heart of the book.

Elisa’s reviews and ramblings: by Elisa Rolle

Excerpts: … a “classy” novel, probably a step or two above the ordinary production of this time. … Adam and David’s love story starts slowly but goes deep …

Reviews by Jessewave: 4.5 stars from Aunt Lynn

Summary: Though not for everyone, I really liked this unusual tale of pro-wrestling and the unlikely romance between two opposites.

Three Dollar Bill Reviews: 4.5 stars from Book Utopia Mom

Excerpts: The entire thing is highly stylized, radically casual, and completely in character for the narrator. It won’t work for everyone. It completely worked for me. … The book is about identity – identity of self, identity of public personae, the conflict of how you recognize it for yourself and how you respect it in others – and uses the world of wrestling as a backdrop to that. … this thematic exploration is done with such a deft, comedic touch that I got utterly absorbed by the book and couldn’t put it down.

(This review is no longer online, but can be found on Goodreads.)

Homosapien at Goodreads:

Currently 18 ratings, 12 text reviews and an average of 3.61 stars.

  • Simsala gave it 4.5 stars, and said: The unusual writing style made the story come alive and real with many laugh out loud moments.

fiction by Julie Bozza